GM Tech Tip: Grease Or Sealant Visible On Electronic Power Steering Gear Is Not A Leak

GM Tech Tip: Grease Or Sealant Visible On Electronic Power Steering Gear Is Not A Leak

On GM vehicles with electric power steering starting in 2009, you may see grease or sealant on certain locations of the steering gear. Vehicles with electric power steering systems do not have fluid inside of them.

Untitled DocumentCondition: On GM vehicles with electric power steering starting in 2009, you may see grease or sealant on certain locations of the steering gear. Vehicles with electric power steering systems do not have fluid inside of them.

Cause: During the manufacturing process, sufficient grease is used for lubrication and sealing of the steering gear components. Also, a sealant is added to areas of the steering gear to keep water and environmental contaminants from getting into the steering gear.

The photos are examples where arrows show some of the common areas where grease may be evident after the vehicle has been driven for a length of time.

If oil is observed dripping off of them, look above or around the site for an oil leak. Upon inspection, if the steering gear assembly clamps, boots and fasteners are all in place, the visual evidence of grease/sealant on the exterior of the steering gear is considered normal, and no correction is necessary. If excess grease is noted, it should be wiped off of the gear. However, the sealant should be left in place as a barrier to water and contamination, and no cleaning is required.

Courtesy of ALLDATA.

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