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Michigan school invests in engine dynamometer

As the automotive technician profession becomes more and more complex, schools and training will need to keep up — and a high school in Brighton, MI, is doing just that. According to the Livingston Daily, the Brighton school district invested $51,000...

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Strange Requests At The Service Counter

Sometimes, I have to wonder if certain ­customers’ brains are firing on all cylinders. But as an automotive service professional, I have to maintain a certain level of self-control while answering their questions, even though what they’re...

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Are All Cars ‘Supercars’ Now?

I attended an open house at Smokey’s Dyno in Akron, Ohio, last month. The shop was filled with Lamborghinis, Jaguars and other high-end cars. It was a great chance to look under the hoods of some supercars. The shop even had a rare McLaren P1 sitting...

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Mazda: Performing Regular Undercar Maintenance

This month, we’ll take a look at brake and undercar service on the Mazda vehicle lineup, with the footnote that even though this type of work ­becomes routine when you have a preventive maintenance mindset, good work habits from beginning to end are...

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Import Automatic Transmission Diagnostics

Don’t be alarmed if you pull an automatic transmission trouble code when diagnosing a “check engine” warning light! Since the automatic transmission operation has a major effect on grams-per-mile exhaust emissions, you’re going to see the...

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Honda: Vehicle Won’t Move or Barely Moves

A customer brings in a vehicle that won’t move forward, ­­backward or both. Check first to see if it grinds or clicks. And does the speedometer read a lot higher than you’re actually going? Chances are the driveshaft is disengaged. This can...

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iATN Exceeds 2 Million Forum Messages

The number of messages in the professional automotive discussion forums of the International Automotive Technicians Network (iATN) exceeded 2 million in early December 2014, with the Shop Management and Technical Discussion forums being the most popular...

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Diagnosing Starter Misses

Contributing writer Gary Goms was called to a friend’s shop to help with a no-cranking condition on a 2006 Chevy Tahoe. After diagnosing a faulty PCM ground, locating the missing ground proved to be problematic. Find out how Gary solves The Case...

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Snap-on Adds Diagnostic Calculator To Website

Snap-on announces a new diagnostic calculator feature has been added to its website at http://diagnostics.snapon.com to help automotive repair technicians and shop owners determine how much profit they could be making by using a Snap-on diagnostic platform,...

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Oil-Related Engine Codes for VVT Engines

Variable valve timing is becoming a standard system on most late-model engines because it offers higher performance from a smaller displacement engine at higher rpms. Oil plays a larger role in VVT systems. They need engine oil not only for lubrication,...

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Head Gasket Do’s and Don’ts

DO: Clean the holes. To ensure accurate torque values and to avoid cracking the cylinder block, clean any dust, dirt, oil and fluid from the cylinder block head bolt holes before installing the new head gasket and head bolts. Never lubricate the...

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Harmonic Dampeners: Why They Fail, What to Look For

Every time a cylinder fires, the crankshaft speeds up a very small amount for a short period of time. It is then slowed down as the next cylinder in the firing order compresses air and fuel for the next combustion event. The speeding up and slowing...

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Home Brakes High Performance Brakes: Carbon Ceramic Rotors

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While it may seem like these systems are untouchable like some super models, this expensive option on some high performance vehicles could be the brake of the future if they manage to bring the costs down.

Ceramic composite rotors are extremely durable. In fact, manufacturers claim that they’ll never need replacement — at least with "normal" driving. They’re also resistant to the kind of distortions and wear that leads to pedal pulsation — merely an annoyance in the “real world,” but a noticeable performance issue on the track.
Manufacturing
The brake discs are formed from a specially treated carbon-fiber compound that is silicated in a high-vacuum process at higher temperatures then any stop could produce. Not only are the resulting discs much harder than standard discs, they are more resistant to heat. The process used to produce the discs for CCB is complex and time-consuming  and costly when compared to cast iron.

The carbon fibers are blended with a resin of carbon and silicon. The mixture is pressed into a mold to create the basic disc shape, including its internal cooling vents. Using heat up to 3,000º F, the resin is converted to silicon carbide, a material nearly as hard as diamond. This is the “ceramic” in “carbon ceramic.” If you tried to machine these rotors, you would need diamond tipped bits in your brake lathe.

The low thermal expansion of the brake discs prevents deformation under heavy braking. Furthermore, the ceramic brake discs are totally resistant to corrosion and offer more favorable noise-damping properties.
 
Advantages
Because of their exceptional performance in extreme conditions, ceramic composite brakes were developed for use in high-level motorsports competition. Porsche was the first automaker to apply them for road use, with Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes included as standard equipment in the Porsche GT2 and Carrera GT and as an option in most other models.

Ceramic composite brake discs provide a 50-percent weight savings compared to conventional metal discs. This reduces unsprung weight, enhances shock absorber response and vehicle handling, and also improves fuel efficiency and contributes to reduced emissions.

Ceramic composite brake discs have an extremely hard surface that provides consistent frictional values throughout the deceleration process, even in braking from extremely high speeds and at high operating temperatures, such as those generated from repeated braking. But the system also provides benefits in low-speed situations.  In the event of an emergency stop, the technology does not require heavy pedal forces or outside technological boosting assistance to achieve maximum and immediate stopping force.

With cross-drilled discs and pads that are resistant to water absorption, the ceramic composite brakes provide superior response in wet conditions as well as dry. Because of their hard surface and immunity to salt corrosion, Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes have an extremely long operating life.
Service Life
Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes have been on the market for almost 10 years. There have been no recalls or lawsuits. There have been some complaints on low speed noise, but Porsche’s advice is to warm them up.

The only real complaints with the ceramic disc have come from weekend racers who have experienced cracked discs due to extreme abuse. Porsche’s advice to these drives is to check for cracks before they head out to the track. With the replacement costs of four disc and pads costing more than $20,000, many are switching to cast iron rotors and semi-metallic pads.  
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Andrew Markel

Andrew Markel is an ASE Certified Technician and former service writer, and he brings this practical knowledge to the Brake & Front End team as editor.
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Michigan school invests in engine dynamometer

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