Low Speed Creak/Squeak From Rear Of Chevrolet Malibu

Low Speed Creak/Squeak From Rear Of Chevrolet Malibu

Some Chevrolet Malibu owners may comment on a squeak or creak-type noise coming from the rear of the vehicle. This noise occurs at slow speeds while driving over small bumps and is most apparent when the underbody of the vehicle is wet. This condition may be caused by the parking brake cables rubbing or slip-sticking on the retainer grommet.

Models: 2005-‘07 Chevrolet Malibu (Sedan Only) with Rear Drum Brakes (RPO J41 or JM4) 
Some customers may comment on a squeak or creak-type noise coming from the rear of the vehicle. This noise occurs at slow speeds while driving over small bumps and is most apparent when the underbody of the vehicle is wet. This condition may be caused by the parking brake cables rubbing or slip-sticking on the retainer grommet.

Correction
Replace both existing white parking brake cable grommets with new black grommets (P/N 15807015) using the procedure below. These new black grommets are made from a Teflon material.
• Raise and support the vehicle.
• Open the underbody clip (No. 2) to provide some slack in the parking brake cable. Use a flat-bladed tool to release the lock tab. Use care not to permanently bend the parking brake cable. If the cable becomes bent, it must be replaced. 
• Remove the white grommet (No. 1) from the bracket. Pull the parking brake cable inboard, gripping the cable on both sides of the grommet.
• Use pliers to remove the white grommet from the cable.
• Line up the new black grommet slot with the cable and compress onto the cable using pliers.
• Install the black grommet into the bracket.
• Reinstall the parking brake cable into the underbody clip.
• Repeat the steps above for the other side. 
 
Courtesy of ALLDATA 

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