Tech Tip: Special Timing Chain and Belt Tools

Tech Tip: Special Timing Chain and Belt Tools

Before you replace a timing belt, chain or gear set on some engines, you will have to look up the timing reference marks. Some engines have multiple timing marks that can cause confusion if you don't know which ones to use or how to line them up. Many engines also require special tools when changing a timing belt or chain. At the very least, you should have a belt tension gauge to make sure the tension on a timing belt is correct.

Before you replace a timing belt, chain or gear set on some engines, you will have to look up the timing reference marks. Some engines have multiple timing marks that can cause confusion if you don’t know which ones to use or how to line them up.

Many engines require special tools when changing a timing belt or chain. At the very least, you should have a belt tension gauge to make sure the tension on the timing belt is correct.

Many engines also require special tools when changing a timing belt or chain. At the very least, you should have a belt tension gauge to make sure the tension on a timing belt is correct. Special camshaft positioning tools (or a bolt or pins) may also be required on some dual overhead cam engines to hold the cams in place while the belt or chain is replaced.

Here are just a few of the special OEM timing tools that may be required:

• Audi 2.8L V6 (1992-’94) – Requires camshaft holding tool 3243, and crankshaft holding tool 3242.

• Chevrolet 3.4L V6 DOHC (1991-’94) – Requires two camshaft timing clamps J38613-A.

• Chrysler 2.0L OHC – Requires tensioner tool MD998752 and tensioner adjuster tool MD998738. The tensioner adjuster tool threads into a hole under a rubber plug in the engine mount bracket.

• Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth 2.2L & 2.5L (1981-’95) – Requires tensioner wrench C-4703.

• Ford Escort 1.9L (1985-’91) – Requires crankshaft pulley wrench D85L-6000-A and camshaft holding tool D81P-6256-A.

• Ford Taurus SHO 3.2L V6 DOHC (1992-’94) – Requires tensioner tool T93P-6254-B and torque wrench adapter T93P-6254-A.

• Honda Accord 2.2L (1990-’94), Prelude 2.2L V-TEC (1993-’96) and 2.3L (1992-’94) – Requires the following for balancer shaft belt installation: locating pin 07LAG-PT20100 (or a M6x100 mm bolt).

• Honda Prelude 2.0L & 2.1L (1988-’91) – Requires two 5mm pin punches to hold dual overhead cams at TDC.

• Hyundai Sonata 2.0L & Elantra 1.8L & 1.6L – Requires tensioner pulley socket wrench 09244-28100 and tensioner adjusting screw 09244-28000.

• Isuzu 1.5L (1985-’93) – Requires belt tension gauge J326468-B and crankshaft wrench J37376.

• Lexus ES250 2.5L – Requires crank pulley holding tool 09213-70010, pulley tool handle 09330-00021, and puller 09213-60017.

• Lexus SC400 & LS400 4.0L V8 – Requires crank pulley holding tool 09213-70010, pulley tool handle 09330-00021, and puller 09213-31021.

• Mazda pickup 2.3L – Requires tensioner adjusting tool 49-UN10-067.

• Mitsubishi 3.0L V6 DOHC Diamante & 3000GT (1993-’95) – Requires tensioner tool MD998752-01.

• Mitsubishi 2.4L Eclipse & Montero 3.5L V6 DOHC – Requires tensioner tool MD998767.

• Mitsubishi 2.0L Eclipse & Galant (1988-’94) – Requires tensioner pulley tool MD998752 and tensioner tool MD998738.

• Nissan 3.0L V6 (300ZX) – Requires tensioner tool EG 14860000.

• Toyota 3.4L (4Runner) and RAV4 2.0L – Requires crank pulley puller 09950-50010.

• Toyota 3.0L V6 4Runner (1993-95) and Camry (1993-96) – Requires crank pulley puller 09213-31021.

• Volkswagen 2.0L Golf, Jetta & Passat (1990-94) – Requires tension gauge VAG 210 and 2-pin wrench – Matra 159.

Courtesy of Engine Builder Magazine.

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