AfterMarketNews AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoCareCareerHub Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service Speedville

Thorough Brake Inspections Are Comeback Preventers And Profit Builders

How many times have you seen a hand-painted sign in a shop window that advertised a menu-priced brake pad replacement for “$XX.95 per axle.” Of course, a menu-priced brake replacement would be good if a simple brake pad replacement would cure all...

Read more...

Automotive Pet Peeves 2: Reader Feedback Is Overwhelming

How many auto repair pet peeves are out there? Well, enough of them that one article wouldn’t hold them all. I’ve received so many emails, texts and phone calls about my article in the February issue that I thought: why not put everyone’s pet peeve...

Read more...

Air Filter Show & Tell: Seeing Is Believing

Air filters are normal wear items that ­require regular checks and ­replacement. Their role is to trap dirt particles that can cause damage to engine cylinders, walls, pistons and piston rings. In fuel-injected vehicles, the air filter also plays...

Read more...

Toyotas, Hondas Most Likely to Eclipse 200,000 Miles

Chances are if a vehicle comes into your shop eclipsing the 200,000-mile mark, it’s going to have a Japanese nameplate attached, according to a recent Consumer Reports reader survey. The survey, which was designed to see which cars, SUVs and minivans...

Read more...

ZF 8-Speed Transmission Replacement

The ZF 8HP transmission made its debut in 2009, and since its introduction, has been one of the top choices for international car manufacturers. BMW, one of ZF’s largest customers, uses the 8HP across its entire product portfolio. BMWs featuring...

Read more...

Shop Folds After Shoddy Brake Work Endangers Woman

A Florida woman was thankful to walk away without injury after her vehicle’s brakes went out for the second time in as many months due to negligence on the part of her local repair shop, ABC Action News reported. Shelly Darling of Zephyr Hills, FL,...

Read more...

Save Up to $250 on Snap-on Diagnostic Software Upgrade 15.2

Now through July 31, 2015, Snap-on is offering technicians up to $250 off the list price for the new Software Upgrade 15.2, plus get the new 15.4 software upgrade for free. This limited-time offer from participating Snap-on representatives is for customers...

Read more...

Red Kap Is Launching Video Series

Red Kap is launching a video series, The Craftsman, to profile custom builders who embody the brand’s values of heritage, craftsmanship and passion. The short, high-energy videos will each showcase a different builder, sharing their stories and...

Read more...

Can Cordless Power Tools Replace Pneumatic Tools?

I recently attended Milwaukee Tool’s annual media tool preview event where they unveiled over 80 new products that will be available later this year and early next year. Milwaukee Tool is known primarily as a leading supplier of professional-grade power...

Read more...

BMW Recognized for Engine-Building Excellence

BMW Group’s engine-building prowess was recognized with four wins at the latest International Engine of the Year Awards. The drive unit in the BMW i8 earned two class wins as well as being declared overall winner, with a further class win being garnered...

Read more...

Diagnostic Dilemma: The Case of the Missing Code

When doing mobile diagnostic work, no-code stalling complaints are a major part of your agenda. In most cases, the client shop is simply too busy to duplicate the failure or, in some cases, a long test drive will yield nothing in the way of useful...

Read more...

Secondary Ignition: The Art of Spark

What is a coil? From the beginning of the internal combustion engine, several different ignition systems have been used to create a high-energy spark. The most popular system, and the one that’s in use today, is a step-up coil. A coil is nothing...

Read more...

Home Brakes Bearings Wheel Speed Sensors

Print Print Email Email

According to a recent BRAKE & FRONT END survey, the most commonly replaced ABS items are wheel speed sensors and wheel bearing hub units with wheel speed sensors. Pulling a wheel speed sensor code does not mean that you should immediately pull and replace the sensor. If you do not confirm the source of the code, you are doomed to have a comeback. You can check virtually any magnetic wheel speed sensor by measuring its resistance with an ohmmeter, but you need to look up the exact specifications for the vehicle because they can vary significantly from one application to another. For instance, older Toyota Camrys and Porsches both use a similar Bosch 2 ABS system. Yet the specs for the rear-wheel sensors on the Toyota are 900 to 1,200 ohms versus 1,600 to 1,800 ohms for the Porsche. Why? Who knows. But if the wheel speed sensor is out of specification, it won’t produce an accurate signal that the ABS control module can read.

Magnetic wheel speed sensors generate an alternating current (AC) signal that increases in frequency and amplitude as wheel speed increases. Because the sensors are magnetic, they can attract metallic debris from semi-metallic brake linings and rotors that stick to the tip and interfere with the signal. If the ABS module doesn’t see a clean wheel speed sensor signal, it may think there’s something wrong and set a wheel speed sensor code. Even a tiny nick in the tone ring around the outer CV joint or on the rotor may be enough to disrupt the signal.

The distance or “air gap” between the end of a wheel speed sensor and its ring is critical. A close gap is necessary to produce a strong, reliable signal. You don’t want metal-to-metal contact between the sensor and its ring since it would damage both. But you don’t want too much clearance either. An air gap that’s too wide may produce a weak or erratic signal or, worse yet, no signal at all. So if a wheel speed sensor is adjustable (many are not), refer to the service literature for the required air gap and adjust it to specs. Insert a nonmagnetic brass or plastic feeler gauge between the end of the sensor and ring, and then tighten the set screw that locks the sensor in place. Some sensors come with a piece of paper or plastic over the end that provides just the right gap when the sensor is installed. To install this type of sensor, insert it until it just touches the sensor ring, then backed off just enough so the ring will turn without rubbing against the spacer. Tightening the set screw locks it in place.

A good wheel speed sensor will generally produce an AC voltage reading of 50 to 700 MV when the wheel is spun at a speed of about one revolution per second. Use a digital multimeter or a digital storage oscilloscope to check the sensor’s output.

If the voltage reading is low or nonexistent, check the sensor’s resistance (with the key off). You can do this at the wheel or by using a breakout box in the ABS module wiring harness. Measuring at the harness will also check the continuity of the circuit. If you get a low reading at the harness, check the wheel speed sensor. If the sensor is within specs (typically 800 to 1,800 ohms), the problem is in the wiring, not the sensor.

If you’re using a scope to check a wheel speed sensor circuit, a signal pattern that is flattened (diminished amplitude) or erratic usually indicates a weak signal caused by an excessively wide air gap between the tip of the sensor and its ring, or a buildup of metallic debris on the end of the sensor. A weak signal can also be caused by internal resistance in the sensor or its wiring circuit, or from loose or corroded wiring connectors.

One new piece of hardware that is being used on certain Chrysler ABS systems (trucks mostly, but LH cars in 2004) as well as the Lincoln LS is an “active” Hall effect wheel speed sensor. Most wheel speed sensors are magnetic (variable reluctance), but the new Hall effect sensor generates a stronger square wave signal that allows the system to more accurately monitor wheel velocity at low speeds. The sensors have two wires and use the chassis as ground.

My Light Is On
The ABS warning light is on in your customer’s car and he wants you to check it out. So where do you start your diagnosis? Because the ABS warning light is on, you know the ABS system has detected some kind of fault. But are there other problems that may be affecting the ABS system? Start your diagnosis by asking your customer a few questions. How long has the warning light been on? Has the warning light been on before? Have you noticed any other problems with the brakes? Has the brake warning light or any other warning lights been on recently? Have you had the vehicle serviced recently?

Depending on what kind of answers you get, you may want to investigate some other things before you plug in your scan tool to read the ABS fault code(s). If the check engine light or charging system warning light has been on, the vehicle might have a low voltage problem that is affecting the ABS system. And if the customer says he had the tires replaced a few days ago, the ABS warning light might be on because of a change in tire size, mismatched tire sizes, a severely underinflated tire or even a damaged wire to a wheel speed sensor.

The following two tabs change content below.

Larry Carley

Larry Carley has more than 30 years of experience in the automotive aftermarket, including experience as an ASE-certified technician, and has won numerous awards for his articles. He has written 12 automotive-related books and developed automotive training software, available at www.carleysoftware.com.
Latest articles from our other sites:

Monroe Announces Savings On Ride Control Components Through Promotion

Celebrate summer and the freedom to head out on the road with the Monroe Summer “Sale-A-Bration” promotion, where motorists can save on the replacement of worn shock absorbers and struts. The program,...More

Philips Headlight Restoration Kit Offers Like-New Condition In Less Than 30 Minutes

Philips Automotive North America, a division of Royal Philips, offers an advanced and easy-to-use solution for hazy and yellowed plastic headlight lenses. The Philips Headlight Restoration Kit is designed...More

Toyotas, Hondas Most Likely to Eclipse 200,000 Miles

Chances are if a vehicle comes into your shop eclipsing the 200,000-mile mark, it’s going to have a Japanese nameplate attached, according to a recent Consumer Reports reader survey. The survey, which...More

ZF 8-Speed Transmission Replacement

The ZF 8HP transmission made its debut in 2009, and since its introduction, has been one of the top choices for international car manufacturers. BMW, one of ZF’s largest customers, uses the 8HP across...More

Save Up to $250 on Snap-on Diagnostic Software Upgrade 15.2

Now through July 31, 2015, Snap-on is offering technicians up to $250 off the list price for the new Software Upgrade 15.2, plus get the new 15.4 software upgrade for free. This limited-time offer from...More

Capture Hard-to-Find Glitches with New Labscope from Injectronic

The Injectronic Labscope No. 5556-A, puts high performance waveform capture in your PC or in the CJ500 diagnostic tool. It's like having a labscope in standalone mode when used with the CJ500 or as...More

Chicago Auto Show Display Takes 1.0L EcoBoost Apart

One of many highlights in the Ford booth at the 107th Chicago Auto Show was a large layout of the pieces that make up the first-ever Ford three-cylinder EcoBoost engine. This 1.0 liter turbocharged, direct-injection...More

Performance V6 and Four Bangers

Any engine builder worth his or her torque wrench keeps their eyes open. They’re looking for anything and everything to make work easier, better and, of course, more profitable. And just as important...More