Why Should a Customer Buy What You Are Selling?

Why Should a Customer Buy What You Are Selling?

Ever wonder why a customer does not see the value in what you are recommending and declines the service or repair? Our sales approach, at times, assumes that the customer fully understands the reason for or benefits of a particular service or repair, when in reality, they may have no idea what we are speaking about.

Ever wonder why a customer does not see the value in what you are recommending and declines the service or repair? Our sales approach, at times, assumes that the customer fully understands the reason for or benefits of a particular service or repair, when in reality, they may have no idea what we are speaking about. To simply tell someone that they need an alignment, tire rotation or cabin filter may mean nothing if they don’t understand the reason why you are making the recommendation. In addition, the customer may not ask you to explain out of embarrassment, which can complicate matters and lead to buyer’s remorse. Before we sell any repair or service we need to explain, in detail, the benefits the customer will receive.

Let’s take a routine alignment, for example. Your technician recommends a wheel alignment on Mrs. Smith’s Honda because the front tires are starting to wear on the outer edges, and the steering wheel is off center. Rather than just relaying this information to the customer (which may not have any real meaning), you need to tell the customer what the technician has found, and then state that this condition will cause the front tires to wear too soon. Continue by saying, “A wheel alignment today with a tire rotation and wheel balance will correct this condition, extend the life of the tires, and help you save money by not having to replace the tires prematurely.” The customer now sees the benefits of the services you are recommending.  Always sell with the customer’s best interest in mind.  Help the customer understand that what you are recommending is a solution to a problem.

When you recommend a service or repair to the customer, it is important to remember that if the customer does not see value in what you are suggesting, they won’t buy. The “value” to the customer must exceed the “cost” of the service or repair.  When that occurs, you will increase your odds of making the sale.

When a customer tells you that they cannot afford what you are selling, it may be true with respect to how they perceive it. What you need to get across to the customer are the consequences if they do not buy what you are selling. In other words, when a customer says, “I can’t afford the wheel alignment at this time”, you need to reply; “I understand that the price for the alignment is a concern of yours. However, it will cost more later on if you choose not to do the alignment now. It will cost you a new set of tires and the alignment will “still” need to be done. So, no matter how you look at it, the alignment will need to be done, either with a new set of tires or without”.

Another thing to remember: Never hard sell or resort to scare tactics. Always remain honest and ethical. You cannot sell anything if you do not believe in what you are selling. Learn all about the products and services your shop sells. This will give you confidence when you speak to a customer, and add credibility to your presentation.

To sum it up, before you recommend any service or repair, think about how you are going to present it to the customer. Promote the benefits that the customer will receive when they buy what you are recommending. Review all costs, benefits and safety features. Promote the long-term savings and the reduced chance of component failure or breakdown. Look at things from their perspective, and before you approach the customer, ask yourself, “Would I buy what I am trying to sell?”

This article was contributed by Joe Marconi of Elite. Joe is one of the 1-on-1 business coaches who helps shop owners build more successful businesses through the Elite Coaching Program, and is the co-founder of autoshopowner.com.

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