Tech Tips: Toyota Tacoma Makes Rattling Noises On Rough Roads

Tech Tips: Toyota Tacoma Makes Rattling Noises On Rough Roads

Some 2005-'12 model year 4WD Tacoma and 2WD Tacoma PreRunner vehicles may exhibit a steering rattle noise when driven over rough road surfaces.

Some 2005-’12 model year 4WD Tacoma and 2WD Tacoma PreRunner vehicles may exhibit a steering rattle noise when driven over rough road surfaces. A newly designed steering intermediate shaft (P/N 45220-04020) has been made available to ­address this condition.

Repair Procedure:fig. 1

Note: Prior to removing the steering intermediate shaft, make sure the steering wheel and front wheels are straight and remain stationary. Once the intermediate shaft is removed, do not allow the steering wheel to spin freely. Use a steering wheel holder to keep the steering wheel from turning.fig. 2

1. Confirm the noise complaint and confirm that the intermediate shaft is the source of the noise.

2. Install a steering wheel holder.

3. Remove the steering column hole cover by disengaging the four clips.

4. Put matchmarks on the intermediate shaft. See Fig. 1.

5. Remove the bolt that attaches the intermediate shaft to the steering column and discard the bolt. See Fig. 2.

fig. 36. Access the intermediate shaft from the driver’s side engine cover and remove the two engine cover clips.

7. Put matchmarks on the intermediate shaft as shown in Fig. 3.

fig. 48. Remove the upper bolt that attaches the intermediate shaft No. 1 to the intermediate shaft No. 2 and discard the bolt. (See Fig. 4.) Loosen the lower bolt, then slide the shaft up and out.

9. Place matchmarks on the new intermediate shaft. See Fig. 5.

a. Place the new steering intermediate shaft next to the original intermediate shaft.

b. Transfer the matchmarks on the original intermediate shaft to the same locations on the new steering intermediate shaft.

fig. 5:  1 – original no. 2 steering intermediate shaft 2 – new no. 2 steering intermediate shaft 10. Install the new steering intermediate shaft.

a. Align the matchmarks and install the intermediate shaft to the steering column first.

b. Align the matchmarks and install the intermediate shaft to the lower intermediate shaft.

Note: Ensure that the splined portion of the shaft is completely seated into the U-joint female end. See Fig. 6. When installing the bolt, make sure the groove in the shaft is aligned properly so that the bolt will prevent the shaft from sliding out of the U-joint.

11. Install the new bolt. Torque: 35 Nm (26 ft.-lbf.)

12. Install the new upper bolt and reuse the lower bolt. Fig. 6:  Left, Incorrect: Splines are showing; they are not installed completely; Right, Correct: Splines are not showing.

13. Tighten the two intermdiate shaft bolts. (See Fig. 4.) Torque: 35 Nm (26 ft.-lbf.)

14. Install the engine cover with the two clips and the column hole cover with the four clips.

15. Remove the steering wheel holder.

16. Road-test the vehicle to verify the repair. Confirm that the steering wheel is centered and no warning lights illuminate during the test drive.

17. If the steering wheel is not centered, follow the repair manual steering wheel centering procedure.

18. Perform calibration of the yaw rate sensor and steering angle sensor. Note: Any time alignment is performed, calibration of the yaw rate and steering angle sensor is necessary.

19. Test-drive the vehicle to confirm that the noise is gone.

Courtesy of ALLDATA. 

 

 

 

 

You May Also Like

Ride Height Sensors

If one of these sensors is replaced, it must be calibrated after it is installed.

Ride-height sensors not only measure the position of the suspension, but also the rate of movement. They are supplied with a voltage of around 5 volts. The signal voltage is changed as a magnet moves past a coil. Most sensors have three wires — ground, power and signal.

Internally, it is difficult to damage one of these sensors. Externally, the linkage that connects the sensor to the suspension arm can also be damaged. The connector can be damaged and cause a short or open and a code will be set. If one of these sensors is replaced, it must be calibrated after it is installed.

GM Rattle or Creak Noise From Front Suspension

The noise may be originating from the front lower control arm front bushing. Here’s how to correct it.

Mercedes Airmatic Suspensions

Diagnostic tips to aid your repair efforts.

The Complete Shock And Strut Swap

One mistake to avoid when replacing struts is reusing the bearing plates or upper mounts.

ADAS Sensor Corrections

When performing a calibration, you are adjusting the connection between the sensor, vehicle and surroundings.

Other Posts

Struts and Memory Steer

We can summarize the cause of memory steer in one word: binding.

Reprogramming ADAS Procedures

As a vehicle ages, the J2534 programming becomes even more important to the vehicle’s ADAS operation.

Air Ride Conversion Kits

Air ride and active shocks and struts will eventually fail – succumbing to either damage to or dry rot of the air spring.

Curing Shock, Strut and Suspension Noise

As vehicles age, eliminating noise is Job 1. But ‘noise’ may mean different things to you and your customers.