Tech Tip: Replacing AWD Rear-Wheel Bearings on Subaru Vehicles

Tech Tip: Replacing AWD Rear-Wheel Bearings on Subaru Vehicles

When replacing rear-wheel bearings on 1994 all-wheel-drive Legacy, Impreza and SVX vehicles, be certain not to over torque the lateral link bolt that secures the two transverse suspension arms to the wheel bearing housing. Do not air gun the bolt off. The proper torque is probably less than you think.

When replacing rear-wheel bearings on 1994 all-wheel-drive Legacy, Impreza and SVX vehicles, be certain not to over torque the lateral link bolt that secures the two transverse suspension arms to the wheel bearing housing. Do not air gun the bolt off. The proper torque is probably less than you think. Since the torques are different for the various models and years, refer to the appropriate manuals for the proper specs for the vehicle on which you are working. If this bolt is overtorqued, it can deform the housing and may lead to a repeat failure of the wheel bearing.

If you encounter a repeat failure of a rear-wheel bearing occurring in an unreasonably short amount of miles, the housing may have been deformed during the first repair. Replacement of the bearing and the housing may be required.

There are some other things to remember when working on the wheel bearings. Never loosen or tighten the axle nut with the weight of the vehicle on the wheel. The vehicle should be in the air with the wheel removed prior to loosening or tightening the axle nut. If this precaution is not taken, damage to the wheel bearing may occur. The axle nuts are not reusable. A new nut should be used with the new bearing. Always ensure that the new bearing is properly packed with suitable wheel bearing grease. The grease that the bearing is shipped with is not sufficient. Always use the proper special tools to install the bearing and torque the axle nut to the correct specifications.

Technical service bulletin courtesy of ALLDATA.

For additional information, visit www.alldata.com.

You May Also Like

Non-Directional Rotor Finishes

Today, non-directional finishes on new brake rotors still serve the same purpose, but they also help in the bedding of some friction formulations.

Back in the day, a non-directional rotor finish was the method used to solve a common problem that occurred on bench brake lathes. If the crossfeed speed was too fast, the rotor became like a vinyl record, and the pads became the needle that followed the grooves in the record. This would cause a clicking noise as the pads moved in the caliper as it followed the concentric grooves.

PRT Launches 59 New Complete Strut Assemblies

Extending PRT’s product portfolio in North America, the new release represents nearly 12M vehicles in new coverage.

We Want Your Thoughts On Electronic Power Steering

Your opinion matters us and can be profitable for you too! Share your ideas with us.

Brake Problems

Reducing brake drag on late-model vehicles is not accomplished by a single component; it takes a system.

Ball Joint Wear

As the wear increases, play increases inside the joint. 

Other Posts

Clarios Formalizes Joint Development Agreement with Altris

Altris will develop sodium ion cells for low-voltage tech while Clarios will lead in battery management systems, software, and system integration for battery design.

Driveshaft Diagnostics

The big challenge with late-model vehicles is the diversity of driveshafts. 

AMN Drivetime: Cal Ganda’s Continental Journey

Ganda embodies servitude leadership, prioritizing team success and customer-centricity.

Eli Opens Reservations for its Micro-EV in the US

The new Eli ZERO represents a new category of high-tech, efficient and sustainable micro-EVs, according to Eli Electric Vehicles.