Tech Tip: High Charging System Voltage on Dodge Intrepid

Tech Tip: High Charging System Voltage on Dodge Intrepid

If a customer's 1996 Dodge Intrepid 3.5L is experiencing high charging system voltage, refer the service procedures listed in the following technical service bulletin.

If a customer’s 1996 Dodge Intrepid 3.5L is experiencing high charging system voltage, follow the service procedure below.

Tests/Procedures:
1. Check the charging voltage at the powertrain control module (PCM) on the pin #3 red/white wire. It should be the same as the voltage at the battery.
2. If the voltage is low on the red/white wire, there is high resistance in the circuit from the power distribution center (PDC) to the PCM.
3. Check the field control at the pin #20 dark green wire. The lower the voltage, the higher the charging command. Try disconnecting the wire at pin #20. It should go to a no charge.
4. Check the powers and grounds at the PCM. If it is still overcharging, the wire or the field in the alternator are shorted to ground. If it goes to a no charge, the problem is in the PCM.

Potential causes may be the PCM, poor connection or corroded splice on the red/white wire that feeds pin #3 at the PCM, short to ground on the field control wire, poor power or ground at the PCM, or a shorted field in the alternator.

The PCM duty cycles a ground to the field of the alternator. The longer it is grounded, the higher the charging rate.

Technical service bulletin courtesy of IDENTIFIX.

For additional tech tips, visit www.identifix.com.

You May Also Like

Constant-Velocity Axle Options

Whether new or remanufactured, complete CV axle assemblies can throw you a curveball from time to time.

Complete replacement axles have become the industry standard, due to their ease of replacement and the availability of economy-priced axle assemblies in new and remanufactured forms. Like many automotive components, the “half-shaft” is made up of serviceable subassemblies. 

When front-wheel drive became widely available in the 1980s, the aftermarket embraced service components for these axles. Boots, clamps, snap-rings and axle nuts have survived into the modern aftermarket, but the “guts” of the CV joint are long gone from ordering screens. Some companies still offer the balls, races, cages and housings to rebuild an individual CV joint but very few shops are interested in rebuilding a CV axle in the first place.

How ADAS Systems Perform

How does steel and rubber change how ADAS systems perform?

Financial Foresight For A Smooth Succession

An effective succession plan provides a smooth transition in management and ownership with a minimum of financial hassle.

Toyota Chooses Communities to Receive EVgo Fast Chargers

Guided by its ‘Empact’ vision to address equitable EV charging and mobility for all, Toyota has revealed the first communities that will receive DC fast chargers.

VVT Sprockets and Solenoids

Advanced engine management systems like VVT play a crucial role in achieving this balance by allowing for dynamic adjustments to valve timing.

Other Posts
Tips For Lifting HEVs and BEVs

If you can’t lift a vehicle without damage, you will not be able to unlock this service opportunity in this growing segment.

Mullen Announces Class 1 EV Sale Through Eco Auto

Mullen announced its partnership with Eco Auto, a national franchise of automotive dealerships, earlier this month.

Road to AAPEX Ep. 1: The Future Legacy of the Automotive Aftermarket

Travel a new Road to AAPEX this season by watching the first episode in this year’s Road to AAPEX series.

Hunter RX Series Scissor Lift: Harsh-Duty Option

The RX Scissor Lift Harsh Duty Option is built for the Rust Belt with a zinc primer base and epoxy-filled joints to protect against salt and corrosion.