Pointers from KYB Help Technicians Sell More Shocks and Struts

Pointers from KYB Help Technicians Sell More Shocks and Struts

Statistics show that you're probably not selling as many shocks and struts as you could. Maybe it's because you haven't considered the possible opportunities? There are actually three different categories to consider. Unfortunately, most shops don't get beyond the first.

Statistics show that you’re probably not selling as many shocks and struts as you could. Maybe it’s because you haven’t considered the possible opportunities? There are actually three different categories to consider. Unfortunately, most shops don’t get beyond the first. The result is that an estimated 98% of all service facilities are selling less than 10 units a month, which represents less than 2% of a typical monthly car count.

The fact is that the majority of shock and strut replacements are for “bad” units, we could label this category “repair.” Leaking, damaged, excessive bounce and tire wear are common reasons for this category. Since around 86% of all vehicles in the scrap yard still have their original shocks and struts, we can guess that the majority of those with replacements were because of the first category. That leaves a huge market opportunity because as we all know; shocks and struts can be replaced for two other reasons: maintenance and upgrades. Waiting to replace a shock or strut until it completely fails is like waiting to replace the engine instead of changing the oil.

What’s maintenance? Preventing failure, taking measures to insure longer life, keeping the vehicle operating within a manufacturer’s designed performance and so on. That sounds like replacing shocks and struts, doesn’t it? Most experts agree that the average shock or strut’s performance degrades enough by 50,000 miles that replacements could be suggested. The maintenance category is all about reaching 200,000 miles or more. Of course not all vehicles wear the same. Annual inspections (or every 12,000 miles) along with a good road test is wise. Consider the use of an owner’s manual that helps define normal and severe service operation as a guide to help decide on a shock and strut maintenance schedule.

Upgrades? Consider the possibilities — driving preferences, top-heavy vehicles, towing, hauling, the soccer team, overloaded commercial vehicles, plowing, performance vehicles along with many others. This category occurs even with new vehicles. Take a look at the vehicles in your shop this week. Odds are that as many as 10% are candidates for suspension control upgrades. Consider that this customer is more likely to invest when the vehicle is young and that they would prefer the improved handling, which of course, you could provide.

KYB’s Monotube Gas-a-Just and KYB’s manually adjustable AGX are an excellent way to meet the high demands of performance enthusiasts. With 280 pounds of gas pressure, the KYB MonoMax will give your truck and SUV drivers the ultimate in control and performance. Whether your truck customers are towing, hauling or simply looking reduce body roll, the KYB MonoMax is the right choice.

Chances are you already knew that shocks and struts are both maintenance and upgrade items, but have you ever presented it to your customers that way? Think of what could happen if you do.

For more information on opportunities selling shocks and struts, please contact you local KYB distributor, KYB representative or log onto www.kyb.com.

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