Management: Things to Look for When Selecting Training Programs for Your Techs

Management: Things to Look for When Selecting Training Programs for Your Techs

With the goal of providing you with ideas on what to look for when selecting training programs for your techs, Babcox Research asked a sample of shop owner readers for their input on the topic.

Knowledge is power. And, nowhere is that statement more evident than in the automotive service world, where experienced, trained techs have the ability to accurately diagnose complex vehicle problems, fix vehicles right the first time, ensure customer satisfaction and attract repeat customers — all key elements required for a successful, profitable shop.

Most experienced techs obtained their knowledge through lots and lots of training. Whether it was formal or informal, on-site or off-site, at home or at the shop, it represents a dedication to learn the skills necessary to work on vehicle systems required by their jobs, and a commitment to keep their skills up to date to ensure they deliver automotive service excellence.

With the goal of providing you with ideas on what to look for when selecting training programs for your techs, Babcox Research asked a sample of shop owner readers for their input on the topic. Some of those responses are listed below.

10 Things to Look for When Selecting Training Programs for Your Techs

1. Assess the quality and reputation of prospective training program to be sure your techs will be getting good information and not sales pitches (i.e. at manufacturer training clinics).

2. Training programs with hands-on training can be the most beneficial.

3. Look for programs that are comprehensive and offer training materials that are easy to understand.

4. Seek out programs that offer more than just the basics, things like troubleshooting and driveability diagnostics. One reader says, “I look for training to solve current problems we are encountering in the shop and issues that will arise soon.”

5. A class that covers new automotive technology, current TSBs, and how systems work and affect other systems.

6. Look for a program that starts with an assessment of the technician’s knowledge of the subject area so the class can be tailored to their skill level.

7. ROI — In your “cost versus benefits” evaluation, consider the training programs’ content, scheduling/availability and distance from your shop to get the most value for your money.

8. Find shorter training programs; longer programs can drag on and lose the technicians’ attention.

9. Relevant, “real-world” courses that impart information that can be applied in the shop right away.

10. Targeted training programs that apply to vehicles in which you specialize at your shop.

If you have any ideas you would like to offer, just send me an e-mail, and we’ll add them to our listing or just complete the "leave a comment" function below.

 

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