GM Tech Tip: Electric Power Steering Hard to Turn

GM Tech Tip: Electric Power Steering Hard to Turn

The power steering inoperative or hard to turn. The vehicle will also have a "Power Steering Message Displayed" on DIC and codes C0176, C0475, C0476, C0550, U2105 or U2107 set. The following diagnostics might be helpful if the vehicle exhibits these condition(s)

Condition: Power steering inoperative or hard to turn. The vehicle will also have a “Power Steering Message Displayed” on DIC and codes C0176, C0475, C0476, C0550, U2105, U2107 set. The following diagnostics might be helpful if the vehicle exhibits the condition(s) described above.
 
Models:
• 2005-2010 Chevrolet Cobalt
• 2006-2010 Chevrolet HHR
• 2007-2009 Pontiac G5
• 2003-2007 Saturn ION

No DTCs
Review GM Bulletin Number 05-02-32-002C to assure you do not have a blown 60 amp steering fuse. The fuse can be blown during improper jump starting of the vehicle on the HHR and ION. Check for this particularly for tow in conditions. DO NOT replace the steering column unless an internal short has been identified in the column that is causing the fuse to blow.

Power Steering Warning Message on DIC with DTCs C0176 and C047
This condition is often the result of excessive lock-to-lock turns of the steering wheel, causing the thermal protection in the power steering control module (PSCM) to take the steering motor temporarily off line. This is a normal operating characteristic of the system. Do NOT replace the steering column for this condition. Refer to GM Bulletin Number 06-02-32-002C for additional information.

Power Steering Warning Message on DIC with DTC C0475 or C0550 in the PSCM with any other codes
Inspect the motor harness connection to the PSCM. If no connector problems are found, replace the steering column as this is an internal motor issue.

Power Steering Warning Message on DIC with DTC U2105 and/or U2107 in the PSCM with any other U codes
Although the code(s) appear in the PSCM, these are communication codes and are not the result of a problem with the column operation or the control module. If the codes are in history, clear the codes and re-key the vehicle a few times to see if they come back. If they reappear, look for a communication issue from the BCM. U2107 or ECM U2105 (wiring, connector, etc.) as the root cause. If the codes do not reappear after a test drive, return the vehicle back to the customer. Do NOT replace the steering column.

Courtesy of Mitchell 1.

For more information on Mitchell 1 products and services, automotive professionals can visit the company’s website at www.mitchell1.com.

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