AfterMarketNews AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoCareCareerHub Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service Speedville

Air Filter Show & Tell: Seeing Is Believing

Air filters are normal wear items that ­require regular checks and ­replacement. Their role is to trap dirt particles that can cause damage to engine cylinders, walls, pistons and piston rings. In fuel-injected vehicles, the air filter also plays...

Read more...

Searching for 'Black Holes': Job Totals Reveal Missed Selling Opportunities

The concept for Maintenance Chronicle is simple: We ask one shop to record their maintenance sales for a two-week period, and then we see what we learn from the results. This edition of Maintenance Chronicle also proved to be valuable for the shop we...

Read more...

Selling Batteries With a State of Health Strategy

Batteries can be an easy sell in some ways ­because all customers ­understand the basic importance of the battery. Good battery = car starts; bad battery = car doesn’t start. Unfortunately, many customers aren’t in the market for that new battery...

Read more...

Saab: Fuel Sending Unit Replacement

The 2006 Saab 9-3 Sport sedan came in on the hook and the tow truck driver said, “I think it needs a fuel pump.” The gas gauge was reading less than a quarter of a tank and the low fuel warning light wasn’t on, so a quick fuel pressure check was...

Read more...

KIA: Brake Light On, Tachometer And Speedometer Inoperative

Applicable Models: 2001 Kia Optima LX, 2.4L Complaint The customer states the red brake light is illuminated on the instrument cluster. The ­customer also states the tachometer and speedometer intermittently stop working. Cause Confirmed the customer’s...

Read more...

Mazda: Fuel System Servicing Precaution

Applicable Models: 2004-’07 Mazda3 2005-’07 Mazda6 2006-’07 MX-5 vehicles During service/removal of fuel system parts on the above vehicles, the memory of the malfunctions and the long-term fuel trim need to be cleared by either removing the...

Read more...

Using Volumetric Efficiency to Determine the Health of an Engine

Measuring voumetric efficiency can diagnose problems like blocked catalytic converters, bad MAF sensors or vacuum leaks. Glen Beanard show you how to do it with a scan tool. For the complete article, click here.  ...

Read more...

Phoenix Systems Sends Facebook Giveaway Winner to Meet Larry McReynolds for All-Star Race

Phoenix Systems, maker BrakeShot, BrakeStrip and Reverse Brake & Clutch Bleeders, announced the winner of its 2015 Win Race Tickets Facebook Giveaway. Suzanne Cleary Drews from Edgewater, FL, is this year's grand-prize winner. Phoenix Systems will...

Read more...

Intermittent Engine Misfire Analysis

Even for an experienced diagnostic technician, attempting to diagnose an intermittent misfire condition that occurs only under specific driving conditions can be a frustrating exercise. Contributor Gary Goms breaks it down, and includes tips for using...

Read more...

Diagnostic Dilemma: The Case of the Missing Code

When doing mobile diagnostic work, no-code stalling complaints are a major part of your agenda. In most cases, the client shop is simply too busy to duplicate the failure or, in some cases, a long test drive will yield nothing in the way of useful...

Read more...

Secondary Ignition: The Art of Spark

What is a coil? From the beginning of the internal combustion engine, several different ignition systems have been used to create a high-energy spark. The most popular system, and the one that’s in use today, is a step-up coil. A coil is nothing...

Read more...

Diagnosing Catalytic Converter Failure Symptoms

Although construction can vary according to engine application, the common three-way catalytic converter contains a reduction and oxidation stage. To create maximum surface area, each stage is generally a ­ceramic or stainless steel honeycomb substrate...

Read more...

Home News Volvo: Pulling the Plug on Plugged Oil Traps

Print Print Email Email

We learned our lesson years ago. Before you fix any oil leaks, make sure there isn’t excessive crankcase pressure. Many of the vehicles we work on have crankcase breather systems that are much more involved than a plain PCV valve. A few years back, we looked at the Volvo 850 system, saw how it worked and what happens when it doesn’t. The newer cars with their extended oil change intervals seem to be just as prone to clogged breather assemblies as the older cars, and it’s even more so the case on the turbocharged cars.photo 1

Today, we’ll be looking at a 2004 Volvo XC70 that we purchased from one of our customers. The car has high mileage, 198,123 miles to be exact, but was maintained reasonably well, so I thought nothing of giving her twice what the dealer offered on trade. It was a great deal for both of us. It had a few small oil leaks and it looked like the oil trap was leaking, so I planned on removing the intake manifold and replacing all the breather components as soon as I took over the title.

I was amazed at just how bad it was. The passage into the block that goes down into the oil pan was completely plugged, making it necessary to remove the oil pan to properly clean all the passages. If we were working on a customer’s car, we would have warned them before starting to change the oil trap that, in some instances, the passage in the oil pan can be plugged and the oil pan may also need to be ­removed. So let’s get started. photo 2

 

Replacing the Oil Trap:

1. Photo 1 provides a glimpse of the engine before we got started. Remember to wait 15 minutes after shutting off the car before you disconnect the ­battery.

2. Remove the bolts holding the power steering line to the intake, as well as the dipstick tube, turbo duct and vacuum lines. See Photo 2.

3. The fuel rail can stay in the intake; just disconnect the one fuel line going to the rail. We also put a rag in the turbo duct so nothing would fall in. See Photo 3.photo 3

4. Removing the fitting on the bottom of the intake can be challenging (see Photo 4). You don’t have to remove the power steering pump or alternator. Just loosen the intake bolts and you should be able to move the intake enough to remove the banjo bolt that holds it on.photo 4

5. Photo 5 shows the electronic throttle body cable. It goes behind the starter so leave it attached and just set the intake off to the side.photo 5

6. Here is the oil trap and hoses ready to come out (see Photo 6). The fitting that went into the bottom of the intake was completely plugged.photo 6

7. The long hose that goes from the oil trap around to the turbo duct has a coolant passage and is trapped behind the bracket that the upper torque mount is attached to (see Photo 7). Once the bracket and mount are removed, you can finish removing the hose.photo 7

8. We finally have the oil trap box and hoses off, and we can see that the lower passage in the oil trap and the passage into the block are completely plugged. See Photos 8 and 9.photo 8photo 9

9. Usually we can clean out the passage going into the block, but this one was plugged solid all the way down into the oil pan, and the only way to properly clean it out was to remove the oil pan.

10. The oil pan is fairly easy to remove. Remove the oil cooler (see Photo 10) and the 30 bolts that hold the oil pan to the block. The pan will come off without jacking up the engine or moving the ­sub-frame.photo 10

11. Once the oil pan was off, we could see just how badly the return passage was plugged in the block (see Photo 11) and how badly the oil pan was plugged (see Photo 12).photo 11photo 12

12. Be sure to clean the oil passage in the pan from top to bottom before getting the oil pan ready for reinstallation.

13. Photo 13 shows the oil pan clean and ready for reinstallation. Be sure to replace the

O-rings for the oil pipe in the oil pan. They can get hard and crack and cause a loss of oil pressure. photo 13Volvo’s oil pan seal kit P/N 30750783 includes all the seals needed to do the job. The only parts that don’t come with seal kit are for the oil cooler (see Photo 14). photo 14

14. Photo 15 shows how the oil trap and hoses will look when they are all put together and Photo 16 illustrates how it all looks installed on the engine.photo 15photo 16

15. With the high mileage on this car, we replaced all the oil trap-related hoses and clamps (Nothing fits better than the factory OE parts and that includes the pinch clamps). It’s too much work to have to replace any of the parts at a later time. The engine number on the timing cover will ensure that you get the right parts for the car you’re working on.

16. The intake goes back on along with the vacuum hoses, fuel line and turbo duct. Plug in your injectors. Finish the oil change, top up the coolant and you’re ready to go (see Photo 17).

 

Photo 17 I think when cars start to reach higher mileage, ­customers tend to neglect some of the regular service and extending oil change intervals certainly contributes to these oil-related problems.

Volvo recommends oil changes every 7,500 miles, and if you follow this recommendation there shouldn’t be any problems. It’s when the customer is “too busy“ and they routinely extend the oil changes past the recommendation that we see these types of problems. That’s why it’s important that we educate our customers and stress the importance of regular maintenance.

 

 

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Bob Howlett

Bob Howlett joined the Swedish Solution crew in 1985 and bought the business 10 years ago. Bob is an ASE-certified Master Technician and is an L1 Advanced Level Specialist. The Swedish Solution specializes in Saab, Volvo, VW and Audi, but it employs four ASE Master Technicians who can service all makes and models.
  • Sammy boy

    Hi!
    Thanks for a really good guide/description here!
    What would you estimate a job like this would cost if I had a mechanic do it?
    Samuel

Latest articles from our other sites:

Saab: Fuel Sending Unit Replacement

The 2006 Saab 9-3 Sport sedan came in on the hook and the tow truck driver said, “I think it needs a fuel pump.” The gas gauge was reading less than a quarter of a tank and the low fuel warning light...More

New Study Reveals When, Where And How Much Motorists Drive

On average, Americans drive 29.2 miles per day, making two trips with an average total duration of 46 minutes. This is according to a new study currently underway by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety...More

Saab: Fuel Sending Unit Replacement

The 2006 Saab 9-3 Sport sedan came in on the hook and the tow truck driver said, “I think it needs a fuel pump.” The gas gauge was reading less than a quarter of a tank and the low fuel warning light...More

Lithium: An Element That Is Charging Ahead

What is an EMV? As you read the hybrid and plug-in articles that my company, ACDC, is writing this year, we have coined a new term: EMV (electric motor vehicle). Rather than use hybrid, plug-in hybrid,...More

Snap-on Introduces New Software Upgrade 15.2

Keeping a technician’s diagnostic tool up-to-date is the only way a shop can ensure that they have the latest codes, tests, tips and data out of the box and miles down the road. With the new Snap-on...More

New CHARGE IT! PP15 POWER PAC Power Supply and 12V Jump Starter

Clore Automotive introduces CHARGE IT! Model PP15, a 15,000-mAh lithium-battery based multi-voltage power supply and 12-volt jump starter. With 15,000 mAh of reserve capacity and multiple output voltages,...More

Lithium: An Element That Is Charging Ahead

What is an EMV? As you read the hybrid and plug-in articles that my company, ACDC, is writing this year, we have coined a new term: EMV (electric motor vehicle). Rather than use hybrid, plug-in hybrid,...More

Dual Clutch Transmissions: How do they work?

Dual clutch transmissions are like having two manual transmissions shifting together while being controlled like an automatic transmission. This is the transmission of the future because it is...More