AfterMarketNews AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoCareCareerHub Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service Speedville

Respect The Tech: When Art Does Not Reflect Real Life

We are an industry very focused on our own image. But, sometimes we need to step back to get a global perspective on the issue. Shutterstock.com is a website where photographers can sell stock photographs online for magazines, advertisements and billboards....

Read more...

Consistently Selling Maintenance Boosts Customer Satisfaction, ­Retention

While seasons change, your maintenance strategy should be consistent year-round. For this edition of ­Maintenance Chronicle, we take a snapshot of the maintenance sales of an 11-bay shop in ­upstate New York during a two-week ­period. What did...

Read more...

Documenting Inspections: Are You Leaving Maintenance Dollars On The Table?

How do you translate scribbles on a ­repair order into sales? There is no magic trick involved — the key is to document the vehicle ­inspection process. The more you know about your customers’ vehicles, and the more you are able to document...

Read more...

Audi: Transmission Does Not Shift Due To Cabin Air Filter

Model: 2001 Audi A6 Avant Quattro, 2.8L Complaint The customer states the transmission does not shift. Cause Confirmed the customer’s complaint and found the transmission did not shift. Inspected the automatic transmission fluid level and condition...

Read more...

Kia Driveability Diagnostics: Chasing Intermittent Gremlins

This month, we find ourselves looking at a 2004 Kia ­Sorrento that the owner says is losing power and stalling with no established pattern. It will run well for days or even weeks at a time without a problem, only to then act up without warning,...

Read more...

Mercedes-Benz: Noise in Front of Vehicle/Dash Area

Affected Models: Model 203.052/054/092/056/087 Model 209.356/365/372/375/376/377/456/ 465/472/475/476/477 If you receive customer reports of noise from the center of the dash area in the above-listed vehicles, this may be caused by a portion of...

Read more...

Equipment and Tool Institute Launches an Important Market Research Study on New Car Buying Preferences of Consumers

In an effort to assist its members in having the latest market information and bringing new and improved equipment and tools to the marketplace, The Equipment and Tool Institute (ETI) has launched a series of Market Research Projects. The current...

Read more...

Redline Detection Names 2015 Redline Rock Star Performance Award Winner

Redline Detection has announced the winner of its 2015 Redline Rock Star Performance Award. Rob McNees of Truck Centers, Inc. (TCI) was selected by the Redline Technical Advisory Board as the winner and received more than $4,000 in cash and prizes from...

Read more...

Rivet Bonding Comes Full Blast

By Mitch Becker for BodyShop Business   By now, most of you have heard the news that Ford has mainstreamed rivet bonding with the introduction of the 2015 F-150. This has forced many shops to look into some new equipment, such as self piercing...

Read more...

Diagnosing Catalytic Converter Failure Symptoms

Although construction can vary according to engine application, the common three-way catalytic converter contains a reduction and oxidation stage. To create maximum surface area, each stage is generally a ­ceramic or stainless steel honeycomb substrate...

Read more...

Coolant Transfusion: Proper Selection Prevents System Degradation

Coolant is easily analogized to blood, both being liquids that are essential to the functioning of an entire complex system. The analogy extends even ­further though because, like blood, coolant has different types, and it’s not a stretch these...

Read more...

7 Reasons Direct-Injection High-Pressure Fuel Pumps Fail

Don’t be scared by direct fuel injection diagnostics. In theory, these systems operate on the same principles as port fuel injection, but direct injection can inject more precise amounts of fuel into the combustion chamber so the engine can run leaner...

Read more...

Home Brake Job Tech Tip: Toyota Matrix/Pontiac Vibe Brake Job

Print Print Email Email

Looking at the TSBs from the manufacturers’ websites, both the Vibe and Matrix are relatively trouble free with no recalls for the brake system. While these vehicles are not prone to abnormal brake noise, both GM and Toyota have advise on their sites that technicians should pay attention to hardware and shims when performing a brake job.
 
Front Brakes
1. Remove the caliper slide pin bolts.
2. Pull the caliper and hang it from the strut. Inspect the piston boot for any damage.
3. Remove the outer pad and push back the piston with the appropriate tool. You can restrict the brake hose with a non-damaging tool and relieve the pressure through the bleeder. But, GM nor Toyota does not recommend this procedure.
4. Remove the inner pad. If the pads are original, it will have a two-piece shim on each pad. Make a note of the positions of all four shims and clips.
5. Using a ruler, measure the pad lining thickness. Max: 11.0 mm (0.433”) Min: 1.0 mm (0.039”).
6. Remove the bolts that hold on the caliper bracket.
7. Inspect caliper bracket for damage and corrosion.
8. Measure the pad thickness. The standard thickness is 25 mm (0.984”). The Minimum thickness: 23 mm (0.906”).
9. Make “matchmarks” on the front disc and the axle hub. Fasten the disc with hub nuts. Torque to 103 n/m 76 ft/lbs.
10. Measure the rotor’s runout 10 mm away from the outer edge of the disc. Toyota specifies a maximum disc runout 0.05 mm (0.0020 in.). If the disc runout is the maximum value or greater, check the bearing play hub flange runout.
Tip: You can lower the runout by changing the position of the rotor on the hub flange. With this technique you can minimize the amount of material removed from the rotor during on-the-car machining. This can make a more thermally stable rotor that absorbs heat evenly and reduces pulsation comebacks.
11. Place caliper bracket in a vise. Clean the bracket and replace the abutment clips if necessary. You can also apply a moly-based lubricant to the surfaces that make contact with backing plate of the brake pad. It is recommended that the slides and bushings in the bracket be replaced if the rubber or metal has degraded. To remove or install the pins, Toyota recommends using a socket (19 mm) and hammer to drive the dust boots into the disc brake cylinder mounting. Apply the lithium or silicone base lubricant to seal surface of slide pin’s dust boots.
12. Install the caliper bracket and torque the bolts to 106.8 n/m or 79 ft/lbs.
13. Install the pads. Depending on the type of shim used on the new brake pad, lubricate the recommended areas as indicated by the manufacturer. Do not reuse the old shims. Note: Install the pad wear indicator plate facing upward.
14. Install caliper. Torque the two bolts to 34.3 n/m or 25 ft/lbs.
15. Torque the lug nuts to 103 n/m or 76 ft/lbs.
* If the caliper was replaced, the torque for the union bolt is 29 n/m or 21 ft/lbs. Always install a new copper washers with the union bolt.

Rear Disc Brakes
1. Remove the clip, anti-rattle spring no.1 and anti-rattle spring no.2.
2. Remove the pad guide pins and disc brake pads and shims.
3. Remove caliper bolts that hold it to the knuckle.
4. Push back the piston with the appropriate tool. Do not use force to screw the piston into the disc brake cylinder. You can restrict the brake hose with a non-damaging tool and relieve the pressure through the bleeder. But, Toyota and GM do not recommend this procedure.
5. Remove the bushings and slides from the caliper assembly so they can be replaced or cleaned and lubricated.
6. Using a ruler, measure the pad lining thickness. Standard thickness: 10.0 mm (0.394”) Minimum thickness: 1.0 mm (0.039”) .
7. Inspect rotor thickness. Standard thickness: 9.0 mm (0.354”) and minimum thickness: 7.5 mm (0.295”)
8. Measure the disc runout 10 mm away from the outer edge of the disc.
Maximum disc runout: 0.05 mm (0.0020”.). If the disc runout is the maximum value or greater, check the bearing play in the axial direction and check the hub flange for runout. Also, you can lower the runout by changing the position of the rotor on the hub flange. With this technique you can minimize the amount of material that is removed from the rotor. This can make a more thermally stable rotor that absorbs heat evenly and can reduce pulsation complaints.
9. Install the rotor.
10. Install slide boots. Apply the lithium or silicone based grease to sealing surfaces of the boots. Place the caliper on over the rotor and install the mounting bolts and torque to 46.6 n/m or 34 ft/lbs.
11. Install the pads and shims. Depending on the type of shim used on the new brake pad, lubricate the recommended areas as indicated by the manufacturer. Do not reuse the old shims.
12. Install the two guide pins to the brake pads.
13. Install spring no. 1.
(a) Hook the spring upper portion to the guide pin no.1.
(b) Hook the spring lower portion to the center hole of the pad.
14. Install spring no. 2.
(a) Hook the spring upper portion to the guide pin no. 1.
(b) Hook the spring lower portion to the center hole of the pad.
15. Fix guide pins with clip
(a) Insert the clip end into the hole of the guide pin no. 1.
(b) Insert the other clip end into the hole of the guide pin no. 2.
The clip should be fully inserted into the guide pin no. 1 and No. 2. If not, the guide pins will come off and the caliper will be damaged when the brakes are applied.

Adjusting Rear Drums
1. Perform this adjustment with the wheel off.
2. Remove the hole plug, and turn the adjuster and expand the shoe until the drum locks.
3. Using a screwdriver, back off the adjuster 8 notches.
4. Install the hole plug.
5. Normal brake actuation will bring the clearance into optimal adjustment.

Adjusting the Parking Brake

1. Pull the parking brake lever to the fully applied position, and count the number of clicks. The parking brake lever should travel 5 to 8 clicks with a moderate pulling force.
2. To adjust, remove the rear console box sub-assembly.
3. Loosen the lock nut and turn the adjusting nut until the lever travel is correct.
4. Tighten the lock nut to 5.0 n/m or 44 in/lbs.

Bleeding
The Matrix and Vibe can be bled conventionally. But, if the ABS modulator/actuator has been replaced or the pedal is still soft or low, it will require a scan tool to bleed the system. Just remember to depress the brake pedal more than 20 times with the engine off to let the vacuum pressure out from the brake booster assembly before bleeding.

 

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Andrew Markel

Andrew Markel is an ASE Certified Technician and former service writer, and he brings this practical knowledge to the Brake & Front End team as editor.

Latest posts by Andrew Markel (see all)

  • Jimi

    help i keep loosing my e-brake. lasts a day or so after adjustment

Latest articles from our other sites:

Audi: Transmission Does Not Shift Due To Cabin Air Filter

Model: 2001 Audi A6 Avant Quattro, 2.8L Complaint The customer states the transmission does not shift. Cause Confirmed the customer’s complaint and found the transmission did not shift. Inspected...More

Bosch Charitable Donation To Benefit Brad Keselowski's Checkered Flag Foundation

In recognition of Brad Keselowski’s exciting win at Sunday’s Auto Club 400 in Fontana, CA, Bosch Aftermarket NA is contributing $1,000 to the Team Penske driver’s Checkered Flag Foundation. Based...More

Audi: Transmission Does Not Shift Due To Cabin Air Filter

Model: 2001 Audi A6 Avant Quattro, 2.8L Complaint The customer states the transmission does not shift. Cause Confirmed the customer’s complaint and found the transmission did not shift. Inspected...More

Kia Driveability Diagnostics: Chasing Intermittent Gremlins

This month, we find ourselves looking at a 2004 Kia ­Sorrento that the owner says is losing power and stalling with no established pattern. It will run well for days or even weeks at a time without...More

Snap-on ETHOS+ Provides Top to Bottom Coverage for Today’s Vehicle Systems

Designed for more than just engine diagnostics, the Snap-on ETHOS+ is a must-have scan tool for every technician. It gives technicians a fast and effortless way to access OEM-specific codes and live data...More

Equipment and Tool Institute Launches an Important Market Research Study on New Car Buying Preferences of Consumers

In an effort to assist its members in having the latest market information and bringing new and improved equipment and tools to the marketplace, The Equipment and Tool Institute (ETI) has launched a...More

Diagnosing Catalytic Converter Failure Symptoms

Although construction can vary according to engine application, the common three-way catalytic converter contains a reduction and oxidation stage. To create maximum surface area, each stage is generally...More

Coolant Transfusion: Proper Selection Prevents System Degradation

Coolant is easily analogized to blood, both being liquids that are essential to the functioning of an entire complex system. The analogy extends even ­further though because, like blood, coolant has...More