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Google Your Shop - What Do You See?

Go and enter the name of your shop at Google.com. Try putting quote marks around the name of your shop, like “Main Street Auto Care.” Now try entering the city where you are located with the name of your shop. What did you find? Your shop’s website?...

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Tennessee Shop Offers Discounts To Customers In Need

Price is often the biggest sticking point in an auto repair job. Some customers just have no feel for what certain services or parts cost, others have perhaps been treated poorly in the past (or are cheap), and some just flat out do not have the money....

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Technicians Are Modern-Day 'Code Talkers'

During World War II, the U.S. enlisted the help of Navajo and Comanche Native Americans as radio operators to use a code involving their language to disguise the real message over unsecured radio waves. If they were going to say the word “army,”...

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Vehicle Unit Increase; Import-Rich VIO Are A Boon for Import Specialists

Need a dose of good news for your business? Then hear this: The influx of new vehicles in the market will lay the foundation for bountiful aftermarket service and repair opportunities. And, with import vehicle sales continuing an ­upward climb, there...

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Honda: Engine Shuts Off, But Power Mode Stays In ‘On’ or ‘Accessory’

Applies To: Honda Insight models with one-push start Customers might complain that when they shift into park and shut off the engine, that the power mode stays in On or Accessory. Honda says the culprit could be a misadjusted shift cable. If the...

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Import Oil Specification Primer

As engine technology has evolved and fuel efficiency standards have tightened, oil specs have increased in importance. Using the wrong viscosity could set a fault code in some applications or interfere with the normal operation of the variable valve...

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2015 Vehicle Lifting Points Guide Now Available

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Pulling Codes: P0302: Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected Intermittent Activity

  This article will address a misfire code from a different vantage point. It will look at a plan of attack for when a code is being set intermittently. The code we are referencing is P0302-Cylinder No. 2 Misfire Activity Detected. While...

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Registration Now Open For ToolTech 2015

The Equipment & Tool Institute (ETI) is hosting its ToolTech 2015 event April 13-16 at the Radisson Hotel and Suites in Downtown Austin, Texas. This year's theme is "The Connected Vehicle: Opportunities and Challenges." Information and technology...

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Solving Carbon Deposits In Direct Fuel Injection Engines

Symptom: Misfire codes, stumbling and suspicious fuel trim numbers. On a scan tool, the engine may show a loss in volumetric efficiency. The driver may complain about a loss of power, poor fuel economy and hard starts. Cause: Carbon deposits on...

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Selling the Complete Serpentine Belt Job

Technicians and customers have pretty much accepted that the accessory serpentine drive belt should be replaced between 90,000 to 100,000 miles. It is a “slam dunk” sale to just replace the belt, but does that replacement belt have the same chance...

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Gasket Guide: Match A Sealant With Every Type of Gasket

Cork/Composite Gaskets Sealants: Cork and composite gaskets can seal a variety of underhood applications from valve covers to carburetors. The type of sealant used with these gaskets depends on a variety of factors. First, you must consider if the...

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Home Brakes BRAKE MATH: CALCULATING THE FORCE NEEDED TO STOP A CAR

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I made a mistake probably because of my distaste of math, now it is time to learn from it. In a three-part series, we will look at the math of brakes. We will start with the driver pushing the brake pedal and end with the pad contacting the rotor and bringing the car to a stop. Along the way, we will explore the math of boosters, quick take-up master cylinders and caliper sizing. 
 
On a mechanical level, it is easy to understand how brakes work. We all understand that brake fluid transfers force from one hydraulic component to another. But, how does this apply to how a brake pedal feels? This is where math is required.
 
You need only two simple math equations to commit to memory. First, the equation for calculating the surface area of a circle (caliper or master cylinder piston) is p(3.14) x radius2. Second, pressure is equal to the force divide by the area or pounds per square inch.  The rest of the math is just multiplication, division and addition/subtraction.

Pedal Ratio
Lets start with the driver. In a sitting position, the average driver can comfortably generate 70 lbs. of force on the rubber pad at the end of the brake pedal. The brake pedal is nothing more than a 
mechanical lever that amplifies the force of the driver. This is where the pedal ratio comes into play.
 
Pedal ratio is the overall pedal length or distance from the pedal pivot to the center of the pedal pad divided by the distance from to the pivot point to where the push rod connects.
 
The optimal pedal ratio is 6.2:1 on a disc/drum vehicle without vacuum or other assist method. This means that the 70 lbs. the driver has applied now is amplified to 434 lbs. (6.2 x 70 lbs.) of output force. The problem is that the travel of the pedal is rather long due to the placement pivot point and master cylinder connection.
Brake Boosters
A booster increases the force of the pedal so lower mechanical pedal ratio can be used. A lower ratio can give shortened pedal travel and better modulation. Most vacuum boosted vehicles will have a 3.2:1 to 4:1 mechanical pedal ratio.
 
The size of the booster’s diaphragm and amount of vacuum generated by the engine, will determine how much force can be generated. Most engines will generate around -8 psi of vacuum (do not confuse with inches of HG or Mercury). If a hypothetical booster with 7-inch diaphragm is subjected to -8 psi of engine vacuum, it will produce more than 300 lbs. of addition force. Here is the math:
 π(3.14) X radius(3.5)2 = 38.46 sq/inches of diaphragm surface area X 8 psi (negative pressure becomes positive force)= 307.72 lbs of output force
To keep things simple, let’s return to our manual brake example. The rod coming from the firewall has 434 lbs. of output force. When the force is applied to the back of the master cylinder, the force is transferred into the brake fluid.
The formula for pressure is force divided by the surface area.  
If the master cylinder has a 1-inch bore, the piston’s surface area is .78 square inches. If you divide the output force of 434 lbs. by the surface area of the piston, you would get 556 psi(434 lbs. divided by .78 inches) at the ports of the master cylinder. Not bad for a 70 lbs. of human effort.
If you reduce the surface area of the piston you, will get more pressure.
 
This is because the surface area is smaller, but the output force from the pedal stays the same. If you used a master cylinder with a bore of .75 inches that has a piston that has .44 inches of piston surface area, you would get 986 psi at the ports for the master cylinder (434 lbs. divided by .44 inches).
 
But, how is this force transferred to the calipers? How does the size of the caliper piston change the force needed to push the brake pad to the rotor? We will explore this next month. 
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Andrew Markel

Andrew Markel is an ASE Certified Technician and former service writer, and he brings this practical knowledge to the Brake & Front End team as editor.
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