AfterMarketNews AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoCareCareerHub Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service Speedville

Strange Requests At The Service Counter

Sometimes, I have to wonder if certain ­customers’ brains are firing on all cylinders. But as an automotive service professional, I have to maintain a certain level of self-control while answering their questions, even though what they’re...

Read more...

Are All Cars ‘Supercars’ Now?

I attended an open house at Smokey’s Dyno in Akron, Ohio, last month. The shop was filled with Lamborghinis, Jaguars and other high-end cars. It was a great chance to look under the hoods of some supercars. The shop even had a rare McLaren P1 sitting...

Read more...

Documenting Inspections: Are You Leaving Maintenance Dollars on the Table?

How do you translate scribbles on a ­repair order into sales? There is no magic trick involved — the key is to document the vehicle ­inspection process. The more you know about your customers’ vehicles, and the more you are able to document...

Read more...

Mazda: Performing Regular Undercar Maintenance

This month, we’ll take a look at brake and undercar service on the Mazda vehicle lineup, with the footnote that even though this type of work ­becomes routine when you have a preventive maintenance mindset, good work habits from beginning to end are...

Read more...

Import Automatic Transmission Diagnostics

Don’t be alarmed if you pull an automatic transmission trouble code when diagnosing a “check engine” warning light! Since the automatic transmission operation has a major effect on grams-per-mile exhaust emissions, you’re going to see the...

Read more...

Honda: Vehicle Won’t Move or Barely Moves

A customer brings in a vehicle that won’t move forward, ­­backward or both. Check first to see if it grinds or clicks. And does the speedometer read a lot higher than you’re actually going? Chances are the driveshaft is disengaged. This can...

Read more...

iATN Exceeds 2 Million Forum Messages

The number of messages in the professional automotive discussion forums of the International Automotive Technicians Network (iATN) exceeded 2 million in early December 2014, with the Shop Management and Technical Discussion forums being the most popular...

Read more...

Diagnosing Starter Misses

Contributing writer Gary Goms was called to a friend’s shop to help with a no-cranking condition on a 2006 Chevy Tahoe. After diagnosing a faulty PCM ground, locating the missing ground proved to be problematic. Find out how Gary solves The Case...

Read more...

Snap-on Adds Diagnostic Calculator To Website

Snap-on announces a new diagnostic calculator feature has been added to its website at http://diagnostics.snapon.com to help automotive repair technicians and shop owners determine how much profit they could be making by using a Snap-on diagnostic platform,...

Read more...

Harmonic Dampeners: Why They Fail, What to Look For

Every time a cylinder fires, the crankshaft speeds up a very small amount for a short period of time. It is then slowed down as the next cylinder in the firing order compresses air and fuel for the next combustion event. The speeding up and slowing...

Read more...

Be Careful When Replacing That Diesel Air Filter

Modern passenger and light-duty diesels with ECMs have mass airflow sensors and precisely control fuel ­delivery. Key to the efficiency and lifespan of the diesel engine is the diesel air filter. A restricted air filter will not affect fuel economy but...

Read more...

Replacing a Faulty Ignition Coil

After a faulty ignition coil is diagnosed and replacement is determined, best practices are essential. Here is a list of tech tips when performing ignition coil replacements. • Coils shouldn’t have any visible damage and the boot should be...

Read more...

Home Tire 10 Ways to Prevent & Resolve Tire & Rim Slippage Problems

Print Print Email Email

For the most part, these tire/wheel slip situations caused little more than brief consternation and had minimal impact on tire or vehicle performance. Generally, they occurred after a new tire was mounted, and the cause could be traced to overaggressive bead and rim lubrication, poor mounting techniques, bead area damage or wheel-related problems.

Occasionally, wheel slippage would be considerable and lead to tire or vehicle damage. But, in most cases, the tire would settle in place quickly and there would not be any long-term performance problems. But now one tiremaker says that wheel slippage is a “major cause” of passenger vehicle ride discomfort and vibration complaints by performance tire customers. The tiremaker discovered that in almost every case, “excessive use of lubricant on the tire beads and rim” was the cause of the tire/wheel slip.

In most cases, technicians discovered, paste-type lubricants were used, but were liberally applied to the bead area and on the bead seat and rim flange areas of the wheel–far too much paste in far too many places, the engineers concluded.

Cause and Effect

In these days of lighter front-wheel-drive sport performance applications, high torque caused by aggressive acceleration and/or braking makes these vehicles susceptible to tire/wheel slip.

Today’s suspension and steering systems, made lighter but stronger by carmakers in an effort to increase CAFE mileage and overall performance, are far more sensitive to tire/wheel-caused       vibration. Match-mounting and careful high-speed balancing are the most popular ways shops have to combat tire/wheel-related ride complaints.

But when wheel slippage is so severe, three inches or more, technicians found that previous match-mounting and balance efforts were for naught. In an experiment, technicians mounted a variety of new tires on OE and aftermarket wheels. They used a common paste lubricant liberally on both the tire beads and bead seat areas of the wheel, mimicking the process used by some of the affected dealers. The tires were then indexed to their wheels with a crayon mark on the tires by the valve stems. The tire/wheel assemblies were then balanced using a Hunter GSP9700.

After waiting 30 minutes to an hour, each set of tires was driven using three different driving styles – mild/slow acceleration and braking, aggressive acceleration, and aggressive braking to evaluate the impact of each.
In every case, regardless of tire brand or driving mode, the tires slipped considerably on both the OE and custom wheels. Post-test checks showed that every slippage case also resulted in the tire/wheel assembly becoming out-of-balance. And checks with other tire dealers confirmed slippage-related balance problems.

Combating the Problem
So, what’s a shop to do? The obvious answer is to not use so much bead lube. But here are 10 suggestions and other precautions to help prevent vibration complaints cause by tire/wheel slip.
1. Match-mount tires and wheels, as necessary. Be sure to follow the specific match-mounting instructions provided by the manufacturer.

2. Carefully clean the beads of new tires to remove any manufacturing-related lubricant residue. Use an approved rubber cleaner commonly used in tire repair.

3. Also, clean the bead seat area of the wheels. On older wheels, make sure the rim flange and bead seat areas are free of rust or dirt. Wash the area with soap and water, and dry completely.

4. Instead of using a brush, use a smaller sponge to apply paste-type bead lubricant. Apply the lubricant only to the bead sole and the inboard safety hump. Keep both rim flanges clean and dry; the lubricant on the bead sole will be more than adequate to get the bead over the flange.

5. European-produced wheels may have tighter bead seat tolerances than domestically produced wheels. Be aware that higher inflation pressures may be necessary to seat the beads of low profile performance tires on these wheels.

6. Make sure to match up any tiremaker sidewall indicator marks to the valve stem hole on the wheel.

7. If more than 40 psi is required to seat the tire beads, demount the tire, re-lubricate and the remount the tire.

8. Index the tire to the wheel using a chalk or crayon mark on the sidewall above the valve stem. This will allow you to confirm any tire/wheel slip should the customer return with a vibration complaint.

9. Carefully balance each tire/wheel assembly, using the balancer manufacturer’s instructions.

10. Should a customer vibration complaint still arise, even without any apparent tire slip, remove any wheel weights and balance the assembly. If the match-mounting mark has shifted, deflate the tire and rematch the mark to the valve stem. Do not dismount, unless there is a need to match-mount.

The following two tabs change content below.

Andrew Markel

Andrew Markel is an ASE Certified Technician and former service writer, and he brings this practical knowledge to the Brake & Front End team as editor.
Latest articles from our other sites:

Strange Requests At The Service Counter

Sometimes, I have to wonder if certain ­customers’ brains are firing on all cylinders. But as an automotive service professional, I have to maintain a certain level of self-control while answering...More

Mazda: Performing Regular Undercar Maintenance

This month, we’ll take a look at brake and undercar service on the Mazda vehicle lineup, with the footnote that even though this type of work ­becomes routine when you have a preventive maintenance...More

Mazda: Performing Regular Undercar Maintenance

This month, we’ll take a look at brake and undercar service on the Mazda vehicle lineup, with the footnote that even though this type of work ­becomes routine when you have a preventive maintenance...More

Import Automatic Transmission Diagnostics

Don’t be alarmed if you pull an automatic transmission trouble code when diagnosing a “check engine” warning light! Since the automatic transmission operation has a major effect on grams-per-mile...More

iATN Exceeds 2 Million Forum Messages

The number of messages in the professional automotive discussion forums of the International Automotive Technicians Network (iATN) exceeded 2 million in early December 2014, with the Shop Management and...More

Loosen Seized Fasteners with Lisle’s Small Fastener Remover

Use Lisle’s Small Fastener Remover (60530) with a pneumatic impact tool to loosen rusted or seized fasteners. A 3/4" open end wrench can be used to turn the socket while impacting the fastener. A...More

Harmonic Dampeners: Why They Fail, What to Look For

Every time a cylinder fires, the crankshaft speeds up a very small amount for a short period of time. It is then slowed down as the next cylinder in the firing order compresses air and fuel for the next...More

Be Careful When Replacing That Diesel Air Filter

Modern passenger and light-duty diesels with ECMs have mass airflow sensors and precisely control fuel ­delivery. Key to the efficiency and lifespan of the diesel engine is the diesel air filter. A restricted...More